The Carl Online


by carlmagazine
October 22, 2010, 2:33 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

By Josiah Burns


So The Social Network is a really good movie. For all you creeps
out there, that’s my current Facebook status. I’ve been to the theater
three times this year (also for Inception and Winter’s Bone), and
Fincher’s latest is easily my favorite. It’s not just about Facebook or
its creator, but also the people he screwed over. The narrative flows
more like The Godfather than a minifeed, jumping between betrayals
within a misogynistic empire of greed.

On paper, it doesn’t sound that fun to watch Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse
Eisenberg) be a dick for two hours. On celluloid, Eisenberg’s so good
it’s a blast. Acerbic stares and veiled scoffs abound as Zuckerberg
outsmarts Harvard, the law, and the Internet itself. He’s a viciously
lovable devil, always ten steps ahead of his audience. Aaron Sorkin (A
Few Good Men, The West Wing) reasserts his reputation as one of
Hollywood’s sharpest screenwriters, alternating between hyper-quick
dialogues and dizzying coding sequences. Against Trent Reznor’s
pulsating score, Fincher sculpts extended music videos. Who knew that
programming FaceMash (a proto-Facebook) could be the subject of the
year’s most virtuosic montage? He’s also not afraid to employ daring
aesthetic techniques to cover important scenes. For example, Fincher
covers the film’s crucial crew race in tilt-shift cinematography, highly
abstracting backgrounds in order to intensify subjectivity.

I think The Social Network is David Fincher’s best film. I’m a
sucker for epic romances, but Eric Roth’s frame narrative in The Curious
Case of Benjamin Button is too clumsy. Here, Sorkin and Fincher
seamlessly weave past and present, overlapping sound cues and repeating
set-ups to create fluid transitions. The Social Network tells an honest,
universal story of ambition, corruption, and its humble origins. In
comparison, Fight Club seems sexist and culturally irrelevant. Zodiac,
while itself something of a masterpiece, runs a reel too long. The
Social Network doesn’t have a single extraneous moment. Each shot
advances the narrative; each character shows a different side of
humanity. Andrew Garfield and Justin Timberlake match Eisenberg’s manic
intensity, charging the film with nonstop energy. These are three of
many technicians within a greater artistic hierarchy. Fincher’s
storytelling empire (itself a network of actors, crew members, and
rotoscopers) is a well-oiled machine, one of Hollywood’s best.



Remix Roundup: Islands by xx by carlmagazine
October 22, 2010, 12:32 am
Filed under: Music | Tags: , , ,

By. R. Orion Martin

UK trio xx sneaks into your life unnoticed. They background your AT&T commercial, your Law and Order, your Gossip Girl. They show up on Jimmy Kimmel Live and one of them almost cries. Lucky for you, there are plenty of remixes out there to help you process the experience.

xx (original)

Islands is home base for xx’s carefully articulate sound. The restrained riffs and drum machine complement the whispered exchange between singer-guitarist Romy Madley Croft and singer-bassist Oliver Sim. The song has a powerful progression without being forceful, rare for such young artists (all born in the 90’s).

Jamie of xx (remix)

While it’s Croft and Sim whose vocals appear on Islands, Jamie Smith is the architect of their sound. In a special remix, he boils the song down to it’s essential components, limiting the drum machine to only 30 seconds of the song. Good listening for late walks home from the libe.

Yasumo (remix)

Melbourne remix artists Yanni Nair and Simon Salerno truncate the rhythm for this more accessible but less satisfying variant. There are no new components to the song, they’re simply mixed to give the song more rhythm and pronounced pauses. Perfect for off board dinner parties.

Nosaj Thing (remix)

Jason Chung is an LA-based producer firmly rooted in the Low End Theory scene. His remix of Islands is almost a reversal of what Yasumo has done. Where Yasumo tears apart and rebuilds the song as a new creature (stronger, faster, if not necessarily better), Nosaj replays most components of the song but stays truer to its original intention. Like the original, Nosaj creates a rich tonal environment in which the vocals can shine. This remix is best for waking up from a nap.

Shakira (cover)

Curve ball of all curve balls. It’s not uncommon for superstars to allude to a passing interest in up and comers, but Shakira is taking it to the next level (Universe Cup). Her cover spares no effort in turning Islands into the pop ballad it’s not. A good choice for your studied-abroad-in-South-America-and-gained-new-perspective-on-how-Shakira-is-actually-a-deep-and-multi-layered-artist-and-you-shouldn’t-judge-her-I-mean-Shewolf-was-good-right? roommate.