The Carl Online


A House for Everyone, and Me by carlmagazine
October 30, 2010, 9:38 pm
Filed under: Campus, Feature | Tags: , , ,

By Emily Ban

I was drawn to the idea of living in Dacie’s because of the open-door spirit and the warmth of community that surrounds the house. Admittedly, part of the draw was that I could be paid to bake, something I always spent a whole lot of time doing anyway. My roommate (Emily Winer) and I wanted to help maintain the wonderful tradition of “grandma Dacie’s” while somehow incorporating ourselves into the house. While living here this summer, we started hosting themed Wednesday night dessert parties that were open to the Northfield community and we were amazed at how many people came each week! My personal favorite event which we threw together was the “1950’s Dessert Party” where we served banana cream pie, angel food cake, and about a hundred whoopee pies. Ultimately, I think I chose to live here because I wanted to live in a home and encourage other students to make Dacie’s a home too.

Living here has been a wonderful experience so far although it is a very different experience living and working here in the summer and during the school year. Granted, it is a rather unique living environment for a student, I sometimes feel as if I’m an RA for the entire community because it seems as though almost all of Carleton passes through my house. While it can be very frustrating to know that sometimes students take ingredients for their own use or borrow pots and forget to return them, living here has generally given me more faith in people. Truly, this house would not exist if there wasn’t such a large group of students who not just use the house respectfully but genuinely care about it as a beloved part of the Carleton community.
I’m always so happy to see students using the kitchen to bake and bond with their floormates over improvised recipes. I also love having the acapella groups here, I’m a very big Knights fan so I feel pretty lucky to get to listen to them practice as I work. I’m also very excited about our new floors and carpet (everyone should come by and see!) and I’m even more excited that the whole carpet installation process is over! It’s always slightly anxiety-provoking to change the house in any way because there are a lot of community members and alums who want the house to remain exactly as it was when Dacie lived here.

I personally think Dacie would love our new floors and would be happy that the carpets were so thoroughly used by adoring students that they had to be replaced at all. From what I know about her, I think that she would be very pleased that her house is still a home for so many Carleton students and for me.



Schiller Lives On, But Why? by carlmagazine
October 10, 2010, 11:59 am
Filed under: Campus, Feature | Tags: , , , , ,

By Lily Schieber

What’s the big deal with Schiller, anyway? Seriously: think about it for a minute. We’re lucky if we see him a handful of times in the year, and most of us will go through our entire academic career here at Carleton without ever coming close to touching this infamous bust—or one of the two busts, as the case may be. I’ve spent the past week or so trying to get as much input from as many students as possible about what makes this tradition so important (a big thanks to those who replied to my mass emails!). I hoped this would bring me closer to understanding this Carleton custom; in fact, the responses added to my bewilderment. People get upset when Schiller doesn’t appear for extended periods of time, it can be stressful to plan a showing, and yet the one thing it seems everybody agrees on is that if anyone tried to stop this tradition, students would NOT be pleased. Let’s put it this way: if the Carleton student body were in a Facebook relationship with Schiller, it would be labeled “It’s Complicated”.

And that’s not a totally outlandish idea. Not wanting Schiller to be left in the dark ages, Carls with some spare time on their hands have created (at least) four separate Schiller Facebook accounts. These Schiller profiles serve as a living archive of pictures, posted alongside student opinions and praise, and maybe like many other online relationships, are just another way for us all to feel close to Schiller, even though we’ve never actually met. I was friends with only one of these Schillers until about two weeks ago, and when I received a friend request from another Schiller, I hesitated. Do I need two imaginary Facebook friends? But for whatever reason, I realized it would have felt weird to say no—and apparently I’m not the only one who felt this way, because I’m certainly not these Schillers’ only Facebook friend. Yet despite his online popularity and great reputation, it’s hard for any one of us to pinpoint why he remains a necessary part of our campus life. Because no single Carl can answer the question, “Why Schiller?”, we devote this week’s feature to a collection of stories and opinions from various students about the history and mystery of our beloved poet, philosopher, historian, playwright, and bust: Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller.

There is little for a current Guardian to say about his job. It is one that requires a surprising amount of work, thought, and planning, and while it comes with no direct recognition, hearing people talk to you about your showings without realizing that you were the perpetrator makes the job worthwhile. Next time you talk to someone about Schiller, just think about the fact that you might be talking to a Guardian without even realizing it.

We have little else to say on matters regarding our current relationship with the great philosopher, other than that he is alive and well, resting calmly for his next presentation. We will however, note that if Poskanzer’s interactions with Schiller thus far are any indication of his presidential term, Steven G. Poskanzer is going to do very well here. The pictures we submitted with this article, along with the shaving picture from a few weeks ago, only scratch the surface of the fun approach Poskanzer has had with us. We have had a secret meeting in the Arb with him, code words, poetry recitings, obscure phone messages, emails full of literary allusion. He is, at once, both a smart and funny man.

For obvious reasons of security, the remainder of the article will focus not on where we are now, as Guardians, but what has come before us. We will attempt to demystify some of the legend and lore surrounding the bust, or, as is truly the case as of present, busts; as became obvious at Frisbee Toss, there are two distinct busts on campus, both of which have some historical claim to legitimacy. Both have actually been on campus for some time (ours since 1989 and the other since 1996), and while both have been simultaneously active before, one is often dormant for some period while the other is active.

Because the busts regularly sustain damage, President Lewis was willing to replace busts that were reported to be beyond recognition, each time with an exact replica of the original Schiller bust. In 1988, a bust from the line of originals was annihilated in a showing with the Pep band and all that was left was the nose. President Lewis replaced that bust with one of the two that is currently circulating at Carleton—the one pictured with Poskanzer on the cover of the previous edition of the Carl (first pictured in the 1989 summer edition of The Voice). In keeping with tradition, the bust that President Lewis bestowed upon students as a replacement in 1989 was of the same size and shape as all previous busts. This is the one that we now possess.

In 1996, reports of a heavily damaged bust prompted yet another replacement. On an iron bridge at the edge of the Arb a group called 85 Lost Sheep organized an extremely elaborate plot for the exchange. This time, seeing how much damage large unwieldy busts had sustained, President Lewis pragmatically chose a small Schiller bust to replace the damaged one, hoping its more convenient size would make it less likely to break. The damaged one that 85 Lost Sheep traded in was the “Imitation Schiller,” not the official bust that Lewis had given to students in 1989. You can see in the attached image that the bust traded for the small one had no shoulders and a stand attached directly to the head. This bust was placed in the Carleton Archives, where it remains today. The bust you may know from the Colbert Report is the small one that President Lewis gave to 85 Lost Sheep in 1996.

A few years later, during the commencement address in 2000, President Bill Clinton wanted his speech to make waves at Carleton. To spice things up, somebody gave him “Imitation Schiller,” which had already been in the archives for 4 years and was no longer in circulation.

Unfortunately very few people really know the path that the busts have taken throughout the years and the archival data is tedious to slog though. As a result, legitimacy is really established by the quality of the appearances that a specific Schiller makes.

Freedom can occur only through education.
-The Guardians-